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It’s true that Marx was highly doctrinaire, something that did not wear well with his compatriots in the nineteenth century, and that certainly does not wear well today, after the experience of the regimes conceived in his name. It therefore sounds perverse to say that Marx’s philosophy was dedicated to human freedom. But it was. Marx was an Enlightenment thinker: he wanted a world that is rational and transparent, and in which human beings have been liberated from the control of external forces.
~ Louis Menand

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The new thinking has to be, a customer has a problem, and they’re a great customer of yours — how do you make them an advocate? How do you make them a proponent of your brand? Because in the world in which we’re living today, it’s no longer about how much money I spend. It’s about what people are saying about me.
~ Carlos Dominguez on Why Social Engagement May Be More Important Than Marketing via MIT Sloan Management Review

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via the University of Illinois at Urbana

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via the State University of Jakarta

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Since World War II, U.S. grand strategy has been shaped by two major schools of thought, both focused on achieving a stable international system with the United States at the center. Hamiltonians believed that it was in the American interest for the United States to replace the United Kingdom as “the gyroscope of world order,” in the words of President Woodrow Wilson’s adviser Edward House during World War I, putting the financial and security architecture in place for a reviving global economy after World War II—something that would both contain the Soviet Union and advance U.S. interests. When the Soviet Union fell, Hamiltonians responded by doubling down on the creation of a global liberal order, understood primarily in economic terms.
~ Walter Russell Mead

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