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The iPhone did not start by selling to buyers who were not previously in the market for a mobile phone. Rather, it began with a small subsegment of the type of customers who would certainly have owned a Nokia previously. At first, Nokia could reason that Apple was stealing a profitable but small part of the market and that Nokia could aim to hold on to the much larger majority of customers who were so far unwilling to pay the higher monthly fees for a smartphone. But over time, the iPhone’s customer base expanded outward to attract more and more of these customers.
~ David L. Rogers

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It turns out that consumers have little interest in the content that brands churn out. Very few people want it in their feed. Most view it as clutter—as brand spam. When Facebook realized this, it began charging companies to get “sponsored” content into the feeds of people who were supposed to be their fans. The problem companies face is structural, not creative.
~ Douglas Holt

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Religion is an ideal enforcer of good public health, for many of the behaviours most relevant to disease-propagation occur behind closed doors. There’s simply no way of getting around an omnipresent God ever on the lookout for those who defy His will. Lest His flock be tempted to stray from the fold, the Torah makes clear that there will be a steep health cost: the Lord will punish the disobedient with ‘severe burning fever’, ‘the boils of Egypt’, ‘with the scab, and with the itch’, ‘with madness and blindness’ – and, if all that fails, the sword.
~ Kathleen McAuliffe

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Aspects of human societies that were formerly guided by habit and tradition, or spontaneity and whim, are now increasingly the intended or unintended consequences of decisions made on the basis of scientific theories of the human mind and human well-being.
~ Tamsin Shaw

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When companies provide a social solution that addresses unmet social needs, they can then ask people to undertake certain corporate tasks, for example, contribute free inputs, produce goods for the company to sell, or market or sell these goods on the company’s behalf. By performing these tasks, people lower the companies’ costs, or increase their ability to charge higher prices, which translates into greater competitive advantage.
~ Mikolaj Jan Piskorski

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