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Coke isn’t going to drive Pepsi out of business, and Toyota isn’t going to eliminate Honda. But in today’s Internet-always-on world, that maxim increasingly doesn’t hold true. Most competition in Silicon Valley now heads toward there being one monopolistic winner. And that is why it is hard not to see that, right now, the only competition that matters in ride-sharing is between the two largest companies: Uber and Lyft.
~ Om Malik

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Looking back, Google’s success came from the fortuitous timing of being born at the cusp of the broadband age. But it also came about because of the new reality of the Internet: a lot of services were going to be algorithmic, and owning your own infrastructure would be a key advantage. The infrastructure—networks, storage, and computers—allowed Google to crawl the Web and rank the results cheaply. As Google got more money, it built better infrastructure, which allowed the company to serve up results more and more quickly, in the process training hundreds of millions of people to use Google whenever they wanted to search. The more people searched, the more data they gave Google to make its index better, smarter, faster, and, eventually, more personal. In short: as Google got bigger, it got better, which made it bigger still. Google is a winner that has taken it all.
~ Om Malik

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For several decades, computers have been a fixture in our universities and our offices. The nineties tech boom democratized computer ownership and we all brought PCs into our homes. Now we walk around with computers in our pockets. Each shift in accessibility—from computers at work to computers at home to networked computers everywhere to computers in our pockets—has allowed us to become more productive, but it has also encouraged us to become more impatient. Why wait to pay bills at home when you can do pay them while walking home? Why wait for a cab to come along when you can order up an Uber?
~ Om Malik

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